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Scolopacidae

Birds Guide

Scolopacidae

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Typical waders
Dunlin (Calidris alpina)
 
Dunlin (Calidris alpina)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
 
Phylum: Chordata
 
Class: Aves
 
Order: Charadriiformes
 
Family: Scolopacidae
Vigors, 1825
Genera
Actitis
Aphriza
Arenaria
Bartramia
Calidris
Catoptrophorus
Coenocorypha
Eurynorhynchus
Gallinago
Heterosceles
Limicola
Limnodromus
Limosa
Limnocryptes
Numenius
Steganopus
Phalaropus
Philomachus
Prosobonia
Scolopax
Tringa
Tryngites
Xenus

The Scolopacidae are a large family of waders, (known as shorebirds in North America).

The majority of species eat small invertebrates picked out of the mud or soil. Different lengths of bills enable different species to feed in the same habitat, particularly on the coast, without direct competition for food.

Many of the smaller species found in coastal habitats, particularly but not exclusively the calidrids, are often named as "Sandpipers", but this term does not have a strict meaning, since the Upland Sandpiper is a grassland species.

This large family is often further subdivided into groups of similar birds. These groups do not necessarily consist of a single genus. The groups are

  • Godwits (4, all genus Limosa)
    Curlews (8, all genus Numenius)
    Upland Sandpiper (1 genus Bartramia)
    Shanks and tattlers (16)
    Polynesian sandpipers (1 extant, 1-3 extinct, all genus Prosobonia)
    Turnstones (2, both genus Arenaria)
    Phalaropes (3, all genus Phalaropus)
    Woodcocks (6, all genus Scolopax)
    Snipe (16)
    Dowitchers (3, all genus Limnodromus)
    Calidrids and allies (25, of which 21 in genus Calidris )

See also

External links


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This guide is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia.